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AIMM FOR GREATER SALES

AIMM is the Alliance for Multicultural Marketing in the United States. It is a division of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA). AIMM worked with its membership – which includes the leading brands in the United States – to analyze and place into a database thousands of ads. Their goal was to create a Cultural Insights Impact Measure (CIIM) which would be capable of measuring the impact of culture in ads. Their research was definitive. Those who invest in inclusive, insightful messaging will steadily outperform those who don’t.

The charts highlight the value of investing in cultural advertising:

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Multicultural communities offer great hope for Torontonians in need

‘Toronto’s multicultural communities are a wellspring of generosity,’ write advocates

It’s no coincidence that economists believe the health of Canada’s economy is dependent on robust immigration. The country’s aging population and falling birth rate make this conclusion a certainty. Equally certain is the essential relationship between large numbers of newcomers and the continuance of charitable services Torontonians rely upon.

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Free Webinar | Ethnic Consumers: Opportunities and Buyer Behaviour

There have been many surveys on consumer behaviour and attitudes during COVID-19, but are taking our research a step further to account for the unique voice of ethnic consumers.

Join our upcoming webinar to learn about where opportunities exist by category and delve into the latest survey results about buyer behaviour in this key segment.

CMA members, e-mail membership@thecma.ca to receive an invitation for this webinar.

Changing logos is a start, but experts say racialized brands need to do even more

In light of renewed discussions around anti-Black racism and police brutality, several well-known brands like Aunt Jemima have recently decided to change their name, logo and internal structures in an effort to eliminate stereotypes and discrimination.

While these long-overdue changes may seem superficial, experts believe they will have a lasting impact on consumer culture.

“We’re heading into an era where people have to be discerning. We cannot be what they used to call the ‘passive plebes’ anymore,” said Cheryl Thompson, a creative industries professor at Ryerson University.

At the very least, Thompson says, these changes will encourage consumers to think about what they’re buying and what it represents ⁠— leading people to demand more of companies. Read more

Ethnicity Matters New Survey: COVID-19, Economy and Diversity

Recovery depends strongly on reaching multicultural Canada, research shows

New research shows how important it is to understand diverse, multicultural Canadians to strengthen the post-COVID-19 economic recovery.

The research — a new survey of nearly 1,000 Canadians during the height of the pandemic — shows significant variations between South Asian Canadians, Chinese Canadians and the general population in what people hope to or intend to purchase now and after the lockdowns end.1

Among the distinctions:

  • Canadians from diverse communities are more concerned than the general population about the quality of Canada’s online services, about crime, about managing online banking — and about racism.

  • In the coming year 14 per cent of South Asians and 12 per cent of Chinese Canadians say they’re likely to buy a house or condo — and significantly more plans to move by downsizing, upsizing or buying a first home

  • South Asian and Chinese Canadians buying patterns are often different from the general population — for example, approximately one in five South Asians plan to buy smartphones, laptops, tablets or TVs in the next 12 months

  • Manufacturers, retailers and the auto industry should take notice — about one in five South Asian and Chinese Canadians say they’re likely to renovate their homes or buy vehicles within the year

  • Grocers and food producers should pay attention too — South Asian and Chinese Canadians are quite specific about what household and grocery items they prefer and plan to buy, in many cases more specific than the general population

  • Saving, investing and insurance-buying patterns are significantly higher for South Asian and Chinese Canadians

“This survey offers important in-depth insight into key consumer patterns among Canadians during an unprecedented time,” says Bobby Sahni, Partner and Co-Founder of Ethnicity Matters, which commissioned the research.

“To us, the research offers three important messages. One, South Asian and Chinese Canadians will be key to our recovery. Two, businesses will benefit if they recognize and celebrate the distinctions among different multicultural communities,” says Howard Lichtman, Partner and Co-Founder of Ethnicity Matters.

“And thirdly, businesses will do well to keep their eyes on what diverse communities say they want — types of groceries and home products, electronics, cars and trucks, homes, renovation materials and financial services including insurance,” Lichtman said. “Those wants and needs are likely going to be at the heart of the post-COVID-19 recovery.”

Socially distant interviews available!

 

For further information: Howard Lichtman, howard@ethnicitymatters.com, 416.402.4948 ; Bobby Sahni, bobby@ethnicitymatters.com, 416.277.2033

 

1 Survey was conducted April 13-27, 2020 among 900 respondents within Canada — 300 from South Asian and Chinese communities and general population respectively. The margin of error for the general gopulation, South Asians, Chinese respondents (at a 90 per cent confidence level) is plus or minus 4.75 per cent for each